Burgers On The Barbie

Remember I wrote about those hamburger patties I made a couple days ago? Well I finally got to throw some on the barbeque tonight and the votes are in: they’re good. All three taste testers devoured their burgers. The dinner table was the quietest it’s been since I can’t remember. My older son put in a request for a “custom” burger, topped with his favourite: mayonnaise, tomato and lettuce. My husband commented the burgers were “Wendy’s style” because of their slightly squared-off shape. Nobody made any mention of the garlic or onions in the patties, which must mean these ingredients were incorporated well into the ground beef. I served the burgers on whole wheat buns that weren’t too “bready” or big if you know what I mean. Even the kids could get their little mouths around the sandwich and they didn’t fall apart (the sandwiches, I mean). On the side I served the kids’ favourites: steamed green string beans and a salad of mini cucumber coins, tomato chunks and avocado tossed in a balsamic vinaigrette dressing. Everyone knows beer is the classic burger beverage, so Dave and I had Rickard’s White, which is supposed to be the suds of the summer. The company recommends serving it with a slice of orange. The drink itself has a translucent orange colour and apparently has “notes of coriander and citrus.” I’m not sure I was tasting those notes, but it certainly did sing on my palette next to the burger!

Homemade Burger
Homemade Burger

On The Menu: Stir Fry

Stir fry is a crowd pleaser on any given weeknight in our home and tonight was no exception. It’s an especially rewarding meal when the parts of the sum are  ingredients left over from other recipes; not enough to make something great on their own, but united, they make an outstanding entreé. No stir fry can exist without its vegetable component so with half a head of green cabbage I added some celery, carrots, beans and mushrooms. To this I added my protein in the form of a few pieces of chicken and a few pre-cooked shrimp that were both kicking around in the freezer. In my pantry I found a package of green bean thread, otherwise described as vermicelli glass noodles. These are fantastic because they give you that substantial carb kick without the starchiness. According to the Gourmet Traveller they are made from the mung bean and tapioca and virtually flavourless, making them ideal for taking on the flavour of the dish you are cooking. I simply soaked them in warm water and once soft enough, cut them with scissors (they are quite long, like hair). I fried up some garlic and onion, added the protein, followed by the veggies. Pour in some soya sauce for that salty flavour, then add some chicken soup stock, cook until the veggies soften up a bit and toss in the noodles. The kids devoured dinner and there was so much we have enough for lunches tomorrow.

Normally I don’t serve dessert. Rather, I don’t call dessert  “dessert.” I don’t believe meals should always be followed by something sweet, so there are no expectations in my house that after dinner comes something sugary and sinful. Why? Those of you who have children already know the answer, but for the uninitiated it goes something like this: if a young child is aware that something “better” is on the menu, they will eat as little as possible, if anything at all, in anticipation of the sugary treat that awaits. So I set the expectation pretty low–no dessert. Tonight was an exception. As part of my Spring cleaning, I delved into the freezer drawer and discovered a few precious bananas. I immediately knew those pathetic looking brown fruit would soon turn into the most moist and scrumptious cake ever. So I baked a banana bundt cake. Normally I throw in a cup of chocolate chips, but in my haste I forgot. To make up for this oversight I iced the cake in a lovely mocha chocolate glaze. I wish you could taste it through the screen, but alas, the developers at Apple have yet to incorporate all five senses into the online world. For now you will simply have to enjoy the view from your side of the monitor….and if you’re lucky, I’ll post the recipe and you can try baking it yourself. I consider this cake one of my tried and true stand-bys. My mom gave me the recipe years ago and it came to her from a good friend. It never fails to please, and I’m pleased it never fails.

Banana Bundt Cake with mocha icing
Banana Bundt Cake with mocha icing
Banana Cake slice
Banana Cake slice

It’s Patty Time!

To usher in the barbequing season I got ambitious and decided to make my hamburgers from scratch rather than buy the frozen boxed kind from the grocery store. A box of eight costs roughly $1.12 per patty. I figure I can do it for less and they will taste just as good, if not better. So I bought 4 pounds of lean ground beef  for $17.23 and with all the ingredients, managed to squeeze out 16 patties. So that cost comes in at $1.07 per patty. Not bad. I think the two secret ingredients that make these hamburgers moist and tasty are the worcestershire sauce (shakey, shakey, wakey, wakey!) and the matzah meal–yes, matzah meal. For some reason it binds really well with the hamburger meat and eggs and doesn’t dry out the patty nor give it a strange bread-like flavour.

I have yet to throw them on the barbeque and do the REAL taste test with my kids. That comes later tonight. But in the meantime here’s the recipe:

4 lbs. lean ground beef

4 eggs

6 Tbsp. Lea & Perrin’s Worcestershire Sauce

4 cloves garlic, minced

1 medium onion, finely chopped

1 Cup matzah meal (you can use bread crumbs if you like)

4 tsp. kosher salt

ground pepper (however much you like)

Early Bloomers

As I write this post, my 5-year-old son is sitting on my lap. He’s home sick today–woke up with flushed scarlet cheeks and a fever, followed very soon after by a bout of, well, there’s no better way to put this, vomiting. So it’s been a low key day around the house. However I did get a chance to wander through the garden to see how everything is growing after a good soak last night from a heavy downpour. This time of year always reminds me of the story of the Secret Garden–a book I intend to read to my children one day. Peaking out beneath the remnants of last year’s vegetation are the delicate shoots and buds about to burst forth in full bloom. For me, an avid amateur gardener, this is an exciting time. And now there is further evidence my garden is waking from its winter slumber. The early flowers of Spring are in full bloom: daffodils, fragrant hyacinths, muscari or grape hyacinths, hellebores and one of my favourites, Snake’s Head fritallaria, which are a relative of the tulip. This flower gets it’s name from the delicate pattern on the petals, which are reminiscent of a snake’s skin. I tend to gravitate towards flowers in the blues, purples, pinks and whites in my garden as you will see from the pictures below.

I’d love to continue the conversation about my garden right now, but the 43-pound child on my lap is becoming restless, and it seems watching me type and click the mouse is less than thrilling for him, so this conversation will have to continue at a later date.

White and peach daffodil
White and peach daffodil
Snake's Head Fritallaria
Snake's Head Fritallaria
Close up of fritallaria blossom
Close up of fritallaria blossom
Muscari
Muscari
Hellebore
Hellebore
Hellebore blossom
Hellebore blossom

Shelf Help

Cleaning a house can be gratifying for me in many ways; it gives me a sense of accomplishment, order and well, cleanliness. So for the last couple of days I have been on a cleaning rampage doing the daily chores of dishes, laundry, sweeping and even tidying up the garden. I even did some dusting, but that’s where the rampage got derailed. The built-in shelves in our family room are home to AV equipment, photo albums along with numerous tchachkas that I’ve acquired either from family members or various shopping expeditions. As I began to eradicate the perfect circles and lines of dust left behind by a bowl or book, I decided it was time to redecorate. Truth be told, I got my inspiration from Nate Berkus, who had recently been on Oprah and suggested going “shopping” in your home and move your favourite objects from room to room to create newly decorated spaces without spending a dime. So I took this sentiment to heart and began poking around the house, moving things from place to place until I had created a new vignette on my shelves.I stuck with my colour palette of celadon (which is watery bluey-green) and threw in some glass and crystal pieces along with some wood to warm it all up. I tried stacking books and even putting some artwork at the back of the shelves. The one of the top shelf was painted by my mother. The oil on the bottom left belonged to my father’s parents. My husband made me the wood box that’s sitting on the upper left shelf. The glass bowl on the books belonged to my mother’s parents and the other glass bowls were wedding gifts. There really is an art to “dressing” shelves, and I’m no pro, but I think my first attempt was not half bad. If you’ve got any advice on what to add, take away or change, by all means I value all opinions.

Decorating My Built-Ins
Decorating My Built-Ins
Laughing Buddha & Photo Albums
Laughing Buddha & Photo Albums
Artwork, objects & books
Artwork, objects & books
Pottery collection & photograph
Pottery collection & photograph
Pretty crystal bowls & books
Pretty crystal bowls & books

Bridal Shower Baking: Devilishly Sweet

There are few things in life I find more rewarding than baking a wonderful dessert for a special occasion. For some, that might seem a bit provincial. How could baking a cake possibly bring one the satisfaction that others derive from much loftier activities like running a marathon or building a freestanding structure for all to admire? Yes, it’s true, I get off on the small things in life. It’s not that I bake to impress or gloat. I bake for the sheer pleasure of it and simply because I enjoy seeing others enjoy my “bakery.” Today was no exception when I baked two delectable desserts I served at a bridal shower for my colleague, Angela. Angela is getting married in just under a month and I wanted to make something appropriate to the occasion, so why not bake something sweet and pretty and something sinfully and naughty? The “angel” dessert was a lovely layered lemon cake I discovered on Martha Stewart’s website. It’s called a 1-2-3-4 Lemon Cake. This cake is very finnicky to assemble; first I made a lemon curd filling the night before. Then I had to split the batter into two pans for baking. Once cooled I sliced both cakes in half with a serrated knife and then reassembled them with the lemon curd in the middle of each layer. The cake is topped with a whipped cream sweetened with vanilla extract and icing sugar, followed by fresh berries and a light dusting of icing sugar. It looked magazine worthy in presentation and the flavour was spot on; not too tart, not too sweet with a nice, light texture. If the remaining wedge on the plate was any indication of the cake’s success, I would hazard to guess people liked it. A lot.

For the “devil” dessert I made Barefoot Contessa, Ina Garten’s brownie pudding. Just as the name suggests, this is a gigantic, rich chocolate brownie baked in a water bath (or as the French like to call it, “au bain marie”) for EXACTLY one hour. If baked correctly, the brownie has a cake-like perimeter and a pudding-like centre. I think the secret to the success of this dessert is not only in the texture, which truly is heavenly, but also in the vanilla bean scraped into the batter….and the chocolate….and the butter. Did I mention the chocolate?

Both were a hit with the crowd. I did sample each of the desserts and even I would pay money to serve them at my next soirée. As I have mentioned in past posts, if anyone were willing to pay good money for my baking talents, I’d hang my shingle outside my door. But I’m not sure anyone would be willing to pay, say, $500 for a lemon cake or, say, $250 for an oversized brownie. Ah, sweet dreams. Truly sweet dreams.

1-2-3-4 Lemon Cake
1-2-3-4 Lemon Cake
Sinful Brownie Pudding
Sinful Brownie Pudding

Get Your Garden On!

I think I can say with some confidence this past weekend was the first REAL weekend of Spring. And I say that because we spent more time outside than inside. It was absolutely glorious. Saturday was my “day off” from parenting duties, but hardly a day off. I decided to follow through with a purchase I’ve been wanting to make for some time, that being a very large scale planter for my front flagstone patio. The two plastic square planters flanking the front steps were serviceable but they were feeling a little insignificant so they’ve been relegated to the back deck for another gardening project. Planters are a great way to get creative without having the hassle of weeds and unpredicatable soil conditions. Planters are their own little microclimate, perfect for whatever style of garden tickles your fancy.

I found the planter of my dreams at HomeSense for a reasonable $59.99. It’s ceramic, which means it will be more high maintenance than the fibreglass kind, but definitely worth the hassle. It’s got a gorgeous irridescent copper glaze, which ties in perfectly with the front facade of the house. Rather than fill the entire pot with gravel and soil, I inverted a large plastic pot in the bottom and poured the soil in around it. Seeing as it’s still April, the garden centres didn’t have a whole lot of plant material to choose from just yet, so I’ve only just started to fill in the planter. Blue is my colour of choice for the planter this season. My centrepiece is a lovely blue hydrangea surrounded by periwinkle pansies. I took some decorative grasses and tied them into a little trellis above the hydrangea. The trellis will be more than just decorative; I’ve seeded a whole bunch of Heavenly Blue morning glories, and I’ll transplant these into the planter when they are mature. A lot of people choose pussywillows for the trellis feature, but rather than spend more money on something decorative, I’ll save that money for more plants.  I’m waiting to fill in the perimetre of the planter with a nice trailing vine, like ivy or potato vine. That should be available by the May long weekend. In the meantime every time I walk in and out of the house, I get to enjoy my handiwork.

Early Spring Planter
Early Spring Planter

Flourless Chocolate Cake

Yes, Passover is over. But I couldn’t let it go by without mentioning my flourless chocolate cake. You see, my husband’s birthday falls in and around the time of this blessed holiday. This isn’t the end of the world if you’re an adult, but if you’re a kid, well then it is the end of the world because your cake choices are severely limited by the restrictions associated with Passover. No Angel Food Cake, no anything cake that requires baking powder, baking soda or flour. So your options are really limited to ice cream cake and cheesecake. But what kid is going to want cheesecake? And after a long, cold winter what kid is going to want to indulge in a mouth numbing brain freezing birthday cake? So I say to heck with it! Bake a really good chocolate cake, minus the flour. I came across this recipe quite by chance. It’s not in a Jewish cookbook so it isn’t even designed to address the dietary restrictions of Passover. It just happens to fit the bill. Come to think of it, it’s also a great cake to make for someone who can’t eat any gluten. I found the recipe in a book called “The Clueless Baker” penned by Evelyn Raab, who recently retired as food editor for Today’s Parent Magazine after twenty years. I own many a cookbook but I must say, of them all I really enjoy Evelyn’s wit and sense of humour in this book. I wouldn’t classify this recipe as “easy” or “beginner,” because there is some egg separating involved and that can be a little dicey for some people, not to mention the folding of the stiffened egg whites. So this recipe isn’t for the faint of heart. But once it’s been made, it can be enjoyed by all! It’s rich, not overly sweet and smooth much like a chocolate mousse. I’ve included a couple pictures, which really don’t do it justice. If you really want the full sensory experience, bake it.

Flourless Chocolate Birthday Cake
Flourless Chocolate Birthday Cake

KIDS’ BIRTHDAY CAKES

I think it’s fitting that during the one week of the year I am not allowed to partake in eating any food stuffs made with leavening agents (eg. baking powder) I’m going to write about birthday cakes. Those who know me well know that I love to bake. I’ve always dreamed of selling cakes, pastries, cookies and breads at a bakery but I’m not sure that romantic vision would translate into cold hard cash. I don’t think I’d like to wake up at the crack of dawn to bake baguettes and chocolate chip cookies for customers only willing to pay me 2 bucks a loaf and 50 cents a cookie.  I have yet to figure out the business model that would allow me to bake my treats at my leisure and at at the same time convince a paying customer that my cakes are worth $500 a pop. So until I turn that dream into a reality I like to bake for my family. In particular, since becoming a Mom, I started challenging myself to bake birthday cakes for my two boys that were kid-friendly to look at, but adult-friendly to taste.

This year I baked my younger son a rich chocolate cake in a cake mould shaped like a race car. I “mounted” the #2 blue car on a sheet of chocolate chip cookie iced to look like asphalt. The cake recipe came from the original Barefoot Contessa cookbook  and the cookie recipe, which I doubled, came from Ina Garten’s Barefoot Contessa Parties! My older son, who turned 5, had far more specific stipulations about what kind of cake he wanted and how exactly it should look. He vascillated between a vanilla “Buzz Lightyear” cake and a lemon “Batman” cake but I reminded him he had the Buzz Lightyear cake for his 4th birthday, so he settled on the latter. So a lemon cake it was (a sophisticated palate for a 5-year-old, no?).  The cake recipe came from Martha Stewart and it’s called a “1-2-3-4 lemon cake.” There’s a lovely lemon curd that I made to go between the layers and the icing is just a simple butter cream. Take a look at the cake I made for the little guy this year.

Blue Race Car Cake
Blue Race Car Cake
Head-On View
Head-On View


Man Oh Manischewitz!

Passover begins tonight. And that means eating lots of eggs, meat, vegetables (that don’t fall into the legume category) and of course, matzah.

For the uninitiated matzah is supposed to be the modern-day version of unleavened bread. During biblical times the Jews, in their haste to leave Egypt after 400 years of slavery, did not  have the time to let their bread rise before baking it. They ended up with what look like over-sized crackers that are, in my opinion, devoid of any redeeming flavour.

Today, these oversized crackers, made under the strict supervision of a rabbi, come in a number of varieties. Plain, whole wheat, egg, spelt, even chocolate dipped. My husband and I are partial to egg matzah which is made with “matzah flour,” sweet apple cider and eggs.

Matzah is also “repurposed” into a flour, a “cake meal” or straight up “meal,” which I often use for matzah ball soup, in meatloaf, meatballs and hamburgers. I actually think it’s better than using bread crumbs because for a product that isn’t suppose to encourage leavening, matzah meal has the astonishing ability to add fluffiness and fullness to my meat dishes.

As I write this entry I have a dozen matzah bagels baking in the oven. I, like my ancestors, was distracted by my two young “Pharaohs” and in a rush when I was making them, so the bagels look more like pancakes. I’ve made these before so I know something’s amiss. I followed the recipe in my cook book, Second Helpings, Please! This cook book was originally published in 1967 as a compilation of recipes by the Montreal-based Mt. Sinai Chapter of Jewish Women International of Canada. My grandmother first gave me this book when I moved in with my husband (then boyfriend). I misplaced the book in my many moves back and forth across the country. I was crestfallen by this loss because that book was very special to me. So when my mom gave me a new copy two years ago with an inscription on the inside of the cover with a sentimental note, I was very touched.

My first attempt at the matzah bagels aren’t worthy enough for a picture, but thankfully I have eight WHOLE days to try this recipe again and get it right. And when I do, OH! when I do….I will be sure and put a picture of the tasty morsels up on the site along with the recipe. Unlike me, you will no doubt have the time to let the bagels cook properly. Right now my modern-day Pharaohs are ordering me out of the house and into the car to take them to their grandmother’s Seder. So in that vein I will say see you in Jerusalem….Happy Passover!